Eden of the East Movie II: Paradise Lost Review

Director – Kenji Kamiyama

Animation Production – Production I.G

“If someone gave you 10 billion yen and told you to improve this country, how would you use it?”

The second and final movie concludes the series of events that started in the TV series as the game the characters are participating in finally ends. I have to say I’m not entirely sure what to think of this series now that it is concluded. The movie focuses much more on political and societal problems related to Japan and I just don’t have the context to fully understand what’s going on. Someday I would like to revisit the series again with some greater background on the problems Japan has been facing for the past 20+ years.

So what happens in the movie? Akira finally gets his memories back from his childhood and learns about his American connection. Eden of the East is under investigation for the links to Akira who is portrayed as a terrorist in the media. And the game finally comes to a sudden end in a rather anti climatic fashion. Basically Akira broadcasts to every cellphone in the world a final message, he rallies the NEET’s to a new purpose and urges the older generation to give up some control and put more faith in the youth of Japan.

One thing that I have always liked about Eden of the East is their approach to technology. In the movie they use a fictional program called Airship which is a VOIP application for mobile devices that makes secure phone calls. It’s a lot like Skype on mobile devices which only just enabled VOIP calls over data connections. The augmented reality image searching stuff that was introduced in the TV series is still a cool idea and something that we could see very soon in reality.

It wasn’t a terrible conclusion to the series but it didn’t wow me either, however there is no reason you shouldn’t watch this movie if you have watched the TV series and the first movie.

Rating – B +

Year – 2010 Length – 1 Hour 33 Minutes

Genre – Mystery, Science Fiction, Thriller

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Time of Eve Review (Movie/ONA)

Director – Yasuhiro Yoshiura

Animation Production – Studio Rikka

Time of Eve is a movie compilation of the 6 episode ONA, original net animation, which originally aired online at Yahoo Japan (Crunchyroll in the US). It was done by Studio Rikka, a small animation studio that specialises in science fiction stories and directed by the head of the studio Yasuhiro Yoshiura. Yasuhiro is relatively young, 30 years old, and like past Studio Rikka works his handles a bit of everything. He is the director, script writer and an animator and one of the few young upcoming talents of the industry. Go watch it on crunchyroll to support more original work like this as the movie hasn’t yet been release on DVD/Bluray outside of Japan.

The premise of Time of Eve is in the near future androids are commonplace and humankind are faced with the problem of the increasing complexity of these androids. The androids are there to serve humans and are bound by three laws:

  • First Law: A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harmed.
  • Second Law: A robot must obey orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the first law.
  • Third Law: A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the first and second law.

These are Asimov’s three laws of robotics and for the society in Time of Eve it has served them well without incident. However the androids are complex to the point that underneath their robotic nature they have human like emotions and personalities. The story of Time of Eve surrounds this premise. The main character is a high school kid, Rikuo, who is noticing strange movements in the log of his family’s android, Sammy. Going to the coordinates of the strange place his android is visiting he and his friend Masaki find a café which has a rule that there is no discrimination between human and robot. Androids normally have a red ring around their head but this café is in a grey zone where this disappears and androids can act human.

Time of Eve is about the relationships between androids and humans and the fact that most humans in this world treat androids like trash. It is not cool to treat them as human and is actively discouraged by the android ethics committee. This ethics committee is not so much an official government organisation but a professional society whose goal is to limit society’s dependence on robots. On the other hand there is an android promotion committee who have been secretly testing new advance forms of androids with more complex jobs and human qualities.

If I have to compare this show it would be like the more philosophical parts of Ghost in the Shell but instead of a military focus it is more about the aspect of androids becoming more human. It is about what androids might act like when not being ordered around and the problems they would face if they wanted to act like humans. Every science fiction story is a metaphor for something and here it is discrimination and slavery.

This is definitely not an action packed show and is basically just a series of conversations. The animation is of a very high quality and includes what I always like to see when watching SF shows, an interesting depiction of a future that is not too far off. Those who have read a lot of science fiction novels will get a kick out of seeing a fully realised world filled with androids that is not on the verge of war.

Rating – A- (Highly Recommended)

Genre – Science Fiction Length – 106 Minutes Year – 2010