Trigun: Badlands Rumble Review (Movie)

Animation Production Madhouse Studios

Director Satoshi Nishimura

Twelve years after the release of the original series in 1998, the busy Madhouse Studios have finally revisited the hugely popular world of Trigun with Vash the Stampede back for another adventure. Original director Satoshi Nishimura returns having directed very little in the meantime (other than highly regarded Hajime no Ippo TV series) and staff credits in shows such as Eden of the East, Monster and Kiba.

Trigun is one the classic anime TV series from the 90’s but don’t expect this movie to expand on any of the themes of the original. It is feature length side story involving a bank robbery gone wrong, a crew lead by the infamous robber Gasback is betrayed by his crew and twenty years later he is about to exact his final act of revenge. Gasback has a bounty of 300bn on his head and rumours of his next heist draws bounty hunters everywhere to Macca City, including Vash the Stampede.

If you haven’t seen or don’t remember the TV series (I can barely recall much about the story) Vash is a misunderstood bounty hunter who has built up a criminal reputation for being involved large robberies. People call him the humanoid typhoon but in reality he is there to prevent the crime from succeeding and stop anyone from getting killed. Vash’s normal demeanor is an obnoxious goofball which makes an excellent cover mistaking him for an impostor.

Twelve years ago this sort of cartoony comedic action was the norm but Trigun differed in that it had an interesting backstory and world. It is set in a futuristic wild west but not in the way Cowboy Bebop was, it is more steam punk with a mix of old and new but very steeped in the traditional western atmosphere of deserts, isolated towns and rampant crime. If I remember correctly the world that they are on is not Earth but some planet that was colonised after large colony ships crashed there.

This movie is a fun return to the world of Trigun but it is definitely missing the broader themes and story of the original series. It has plenty of great over the top action scenes which is a throwback to the 90’s which is infrequently done well these days. It is nice to see a HD widescreen version of Trigun, as the original was 4:3, the animation really pops with the vibrant colors of the original. I’d recommend people see the TV series if they haven’t and if they want to see more just keep in mind this is really just a side story.

Rating – B +

Genre – Action, Comedy, Science Fiction, Western Year – 2010

The Sky Crawlers Review (Movie)

Animation ProductionProduction I.G

Director Mamoru Oshii

The Sky Crawlers is a 2008 movie from enigmatic director Maroru Oshii who is famous for directing the Patlabor movies, Uresei Yatsura TV series and most notably the Ghost in the Shell movies. He is a much lauded director whose directing style is much more subdued, primarily relying on visuals and character design to covey his message. He isn’t a director whose every work is a masterpiece but he is capable of putting out a classic every so often, unfortunately The Sky Crawlers isn’t one of them. The concept is interesting enough as it is set in an alternate history where war is privatised and played out for entertainment. But it is a long fairly uneventful movie, while beautifully animated movie there is very little going on to universally recommend it to anyone.

The movie starts off (in a typical Oshii way) with an impressive CG action scene of a dogfight with a very high level of detail put in the mechanics and design of the planes. Once it’s over the opening credits roll among the clouds and ends in a peaceful landing of a plane piloted by the main character Yuichi Kannami. Yuichi is a new arrival at small airfield replacing a pilot who died in mysterious circumstances as he was not killed up in the air. The movie is about the mystery of this and Yuichi’s connection to past events.

The events in the movie play out with a familiar but uncanny mood to it as things are slightly off. It is evocatively quiet most of times which give you the time to scan the screen and examine the visuals. You definitely need to watch the movie with a different mindset and get into the deeper underlying themes that Oshii is trying to convey. Yuichi and the rest of the participant pilots in the war are all children. They are not normal children because they don’t age, they stay the same age and usually only die if killed in battle. They are genetically engineered and are referred to as Kildren and their only purpose in life is to fight this war controlled by adults as a spectacle for TV. They have the freedom to do whatever they want in their down time but they are just so different from everyone else. There’s a big revelation that serves as the climax of the film but if you want to enjoy the film you have to let your mind mull over the philosophical themes and implications of the film.

Rating – B

Genre – Mystery Length – 121 Minutes Year – 2008