Redline Review (Movie)

Animation ProductionMadhouse Studios

DirectorTakeshi Koike

Redline is the most visually entertaining animated movie to come out of Japan for years, now out on Blu-Ray it is a must own for anyone who has watched anime. It debuted back in August 2009 at the Locarno International Film Festival in Switzerland and was released in Japan in October 2010. It has been a instant hit with critics and anyone lucky to see screenings of it but now anyone can see it.

The man responsible for Redline is Madhouse Studio’s Takeshi Koike, who started out as an animator under the wing of the well known director Yoshiaki Kawajiri. Redline is Koike’s   full film directorial debut, before this he did the “World Record” segment of the Animatrix as well as directing the pilots of Samurai Champloo and Iron Man. At the age of 43 we have a lot to look forward to from Koike who has shown us that he has a eye for action and  animation design.

It is set in an intergalactic future where the biggest underground racing event in the world, Redline, is being held on a hostile planet which doesn’t want the race there because of their hidden military secrets. The plot is simple enough, we follow a human racer, JP, who uses a traditional car which doesn’t have any weapons equipped up against a cast of characters from different planets. The character are outrageous and fun to watch, JP has a retro style going with his classic muscle styled car and pompadour. Redline is all about the visuals and action, the sense of pace that is visualised is incredibly cool, the height of it is when JP use his nitro boost. Action also comes into play with the other racers using their weapons to take each other out as well as the military on the planet trying to take out the racers to protect their secrets. There is a cool Akira sort of vibe with one particular biological weapon that pops up mid race that blew me away.

I’ve forgotten the last time I was so impressed by the creativity and visual style on show in an anime. Redline is a definite must watch, buy the Blu-Ray show your non anime watching fans, it is that good.

Rating – A +

Genre – Action, Racing, Science Fiction

Year – 2010

Advertisements

Akira Blu-Ray Review

DirectorKatsuhiro Otomo

Animation ProductionTokyo Movie Shinsha

Akira was originally screened in Japan on July 16th 1988, around 22 and a half years ago, and is coincidently exactly 1 month older than me. I can’t remember the first time I saw it but it was sometime in the early 2000’s. It didn’t entirely wow me at first because it was built up in my mind to be something else and it was also very early in my anime and film watching days. But revisiting this classic once again on Blu-Ray and this time in the best possible conditions outside of a theatre, I completely agree with why this is praised as the best Japanese animated film ever created.

Set in Neo Tokyo 2019 years after a nuclear like explosion destroys a large section of Tokyo, the military continues to experiment with this devastating uncontrollable power that started the whole situation. Since then Tokyo has turned into a run down cyberpunk looking city full of gangs, protestors and a strong military presence.

The main characters, Kaneda and Tetsuo, are the typical delinquent teenagers who are in a biker gang. Kaneda is the strong charismatic leader of the group while Tetsuo is the shy childhood friend. During a intense chase scene with a rival gang Tetsuo encounters a genetically modified human which awakens the power within Tetsuo. He is then quickly whisked away by the military and is experimented on to try and control this power within.

The name of the movie refers to one of the original human experiment, Akira who was the cause of the original disaster. Akira in the mind of some of the Tokyo population has became a messiah figure and is seen as an all powerful being. It’s hard to explain but he wielded an ultimate sort of energy which was unlocked in his generic material. The scientist couldn’t control him which resulted in the disaster. Despite this the military continued experimenting to awaken this power within others.

Lony ago there were people who tried to gain control of that power. That is, all of the government’s requests. But they failed in their attempt, and it triggered the fall of Tokyo. And that power is something that is totally out of our….

What I like most of about the film is the quality of the animation and visual detail. The iconic red bike of Kaneda and his orange jacket are so memorable along with the use of red throughout the movie. It is a movie with a grand scale and a sort of maturity that isn’t really present in anime anymore.

As for the Blu-Ray features there is usual set of language option with a sparse number of extra features (trailers, storyboards). But the key is the picture quality which looks sharp and a noticeable difference over VHS, but I’m not sure about how much better it looks from DVD. Definitely one to keep on your shelf and revisit over and over again.

Year – 1988 Length – 124 Minutes

Trigun: Badlands Rumble Review (Movie)

Animation Production Madhouse Studios

Director Satoshi Nishimura

Twelve years after the release of the original series in 1998, the busy Madhouse Studios have finally revisited the hugely popular world of Trigun with Vash the Stampede back for another adventure. Original director Satoshi Nishimura returns having directed very little in the meantime (other than highly regarded Hajime no Ippo TV series) and staff credits in shows such as Eden of the East, Monster and Kiba.

Trigun is one the classic anime TV series from the 90’s but don’t expect this movie to expand on any of the themes of the original. It is feature length side story involving a bank robbery gone wrong, a crew lead by the infamous robber Gasback is betrayed by his crew and twenty years later he is about to exact his final act of revenge. Gasback has a bounty of 300bn on his head and rumours of his next heist draws bounty hunters everywhere to Macca City, including Vash the Stampede.

If you haven’t seen or don’t remember the TV series (I can barely recall much about the story) Vash is a misunderstood bounty hunter who has built up a criminal reputation for being involved large robberies. People call him the humanoid typhoon but in reality he is there to prevent the crime from succeeding and stop anyone from getting killed. Vash’s normal demeanor is an obnoxious goofball which makes an excellent cover mistaking him for an impostor.

Twelve years ago this sort of cartoony comedic action was the norm but Trigun differed in that it had an interesting backstory and world. It is set in a futuristic wild west but not in the way Cowboy Bebop was, it is more steam punk with a mix of old and new but very steeped in the traditional western atmosphere of deserts, isolated towns and rampant crime. If I remember correctly the world that they are on is not Earth but some planet that was colonised after large colony ships crashed there.

This movie is a fun return to the world of Trigun but it is definitely missing the broader themes and story of the original series. It has plenty of great over the top action scenes which is a throwback to the 90’s which is infrequently done well these days. It is nice to see a HD widescreen version of Trigun, as the original was 4:3, the animation really pops with the vibrant colors of the original. I’d recommend people see the TV series if they haven’t and if they want to see more just keep in mind this is really just a side story.

Rating – B +

Genre – Action, Comedy, Science Fiction, Western Year – 2010

The Sky Crawlers Review (Movie)

Animation ProductionProduction I.G

Director Mamoru Oshii

The Sky Crawlers is a 2008 movie from enigmatic director Maroru Oshii who is famous for directing the Patlabor movies, Uresei Yatsura TV series and most notably the Ghost in the Shell movies. He is a much lauded director whose directing style is much more subdued, primarily relying on visuals and character design to covey his message. He isn’t a director whose every work is a masterpiece but he is capable of putting out a classic every so often, unfortunately The Sky Crawlers isn’t one of them. The concept is interesting enough as it is set in an alternate history where war is privatised and played out for entertainment. But it is a long fairly uneventful movie, while beautifully animated movie there is very little going on to universally recommend it to anyone.

The movie starts off (in a typical Oshii way) with an impressive CG action scene of a dogfight with a very high level of detail put in the mechanics and design of the planes. Once it’s over the opening credits roll among the clouds and ends in a peaceful landing of a plane piloted by the main character Yuichi Kannami. Yuichi is a new arrival at small airfield replacing a pilot who died in mysterious circumstances as he was not killed up in the air. The movie is about the mystery of this and Yuichi’s connection to past events.

The events in the movie play out with a familiar but uncanny mood to it as things are slightly off. It is evocatively quiet most of times which give you the time to scan the screen and examine the visuals. You definitely need to watch the movie with a different mindset and get into the deeper underlying themes that Oshii is trying to convey. Yuichi and the rest of the participant pilots in the war are all children. They are not normal children because they don’t age, they stay the same age and usually only die if killed in battle. They are genetically engineered and are referred to as Kildren and their only purpose in life is to fight this war controlled by adults as a spectacle for TV. They have the freedom to do whatever they want in their down time but they are just so different from everyone else. There’s a big revelation that serves as the climax of the film but if you want to enjoy the film you have to let your mind mull over the philosophical themes and implications of the film.

Rating – B

Genre – Mystery Length – 121 Minutes Year – 2008

High School of the Dead Review

Animation ProductionMadhouse Studios

Director Tetsuro Araki

On the surface High School of the Dead (H.O.T.D.) seems like it has everything going for it, production by Madhouse and directed by the director of the Death Note TV series. It has zombies, which have been all the rage for at least the last 5 years, and at least in the first episode seemed like it would take a more serious approach to the subject. But dig deeper you will find an amalgamation of fan service, Japanese high school antics, violence and typical bs anime plot. Granted it is done with some competence but don’t expect anything more, this show is entirely alright for just some occasional interesting action set pieces involving zombies.

The show is structured on group of high school students who group together to escape their zombie infected school and aim to find out if each of their families are okay. It looks like they plan to do a lot more than 12 episodes as we only get to one family in this season. The show ends up focusing quite a lot on romance and the situations they encounter as they find a way to travel back to their homes. While watching the first few episodes I was excited about how the Japanese would tackle the idea of zombies. Aspects such as what attracts them and what people and authorities might do to protect themselves were explored but not that much. One particular aspect I though was cool was the barricading of bridges and using a bulldozer to clear zombies on them.

What this show does do quite well, is that at least once an episode there is an genuinely awesome action moment usually involving some interesting zombies. Some of my favourites are the children zombies, which Hollywood is conscious of always excluding, and zombies with weird attire such as the motorcycle helmet zombie. There are also quite a few vehicular action moments that are typical but fun to watch regardless. It is probably not enough to recommend people to watch the show but there is always a time and situation for these type of shows. The epilogue of the season ends with the crew in front of a shopping mall, so we know what to expect for the next season of H.O.T.D.

Rating – C+

Genre – Action, Drama, Horror Length – 12 Episode series Year – 2010

Adapted from manga


High School of the Dead Episode 11

Episode 11 Dead Storm Rising

Summary: A more moody episode with tensions reaching their peak and some questions answered. Mr Shido is back and is initially let into the mansion compound. We learn Shido’s father was politician who left his mother who then commited suicide. For some reason Shido then left home to be a teacher. The tension between Rei and Mr Shido is explained, Shido’s father is having trouble with Rei’s police chief father and calls Shido to make Rei fail a grade.

At the end of the episode we cut to US nuclear submarine as they are given orders to launch the nuke. Russia and Usa are firing MIRV’s at each other and it looks like the world is heading into armageddon. A MIRV if you don’t know is a multiple independently targetable re-entry vehicle with carries multiple nukes on a single ballistic missile.

High School of the Dead Episode 10

Episode 10 The Dead’s House Rules

Summary: While they are now safe at Saeko’s large mansion the group are frustrated being part of a larger group who treat them as kids and don’t give them any responsibilities. Saeko is mad at her family for only protecting themselves and not coming for her. Saeko’s father is the head of an important family and leads with a strong sense of traditional honour.